Chyanime

Chyanime

thegamecollection:

2K Games have today confirmed the lastest game in the Borderlands series. Sadly not Borderlands 3 but Borderlands: The Pre-Sequel. The game takes place on Pandora’s moon and is set between the first and second Borderlands.

Fighting alongside Handsome Jack we’ll get the chance to play as four characters already familiar to the Borderlands Universe:

  • Athena, the Gladiator: Uses her Kinetic Aspis, which is a shield that can absorb incoming damage, then convert it back into energy to use against enemies. Athena made her debut in The Secret Armory of General Knoxx DLC for the first Borderlands game.
  • Wilhelm, the Enforcer: Wilhelm was previously seen in Borderlands 2 as one of the first deadly bosses in the game.
  • Nisha, the Lawbringer: The sheriff of Lynchwood from Borderlands 2, Nisha will be dealing out her own brand of justice.
  • Claptrap, the Fragtrap: The goofy robot companion from Borderlands 2, now playable for the first time.

Borderlands: The Pre-Sequel will be released in Autumn 2014 on PS3, Xbox 360 and PC. Next-gen owners will have to wait for Borderlands 3 which is apparently not even in development yet :-(

- Giles

(via cannibalsanddinosaurs)

sinbad: legend of the seven seas | concept art

(Source: livlily.blogspot.com, via askpitchandjack)

nothingcorporate:

opinions on abortions are kinda like nipples

everyone has them but women’s are a little bit more relevant 

(Source: uncooler, via 50shadesofpitchblack)

jasonwongart:

Speed Animation 101
Wanted to try some water so here is my first attempt.  it was actually really fun!  this took me about 45 minutes after watching some ref videos to try and get the viscosity correct…. played around with some of the timing too.  very different from animating smoke for sure.

jasonwongart:

Speed Animation 101

Wanted to try some water so here is my first attempt.  it was actually really fun!  this took me about 45 minutes after watching some ref videos to try and get the viscosity correct…. played around with some of the timing too.  very different from animating smoke for sure.

giancarlovolpe:

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips SUPER WEEK - Push it!Clarity is probably the most important thing to think about at all time when boarding. Pushing your poses to an undeniable level of clarity will improve the clarity of the storytelling in general. Don’t leave space for uncertainty in posing out your characters. Your audience will be more engaged and entertained by the sequence.This is the last post for the Super Week. I hope you enjoyed it. Back on the regular schedule next week (Every Tuesday).Norm

What a great series.  Thanks for posting these!

giancarlovolpe:

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips SUPER WEEK - Push it!

Clarity is probably the most important thing to think about at all time when boarding. Pushing your poses to an undeniable level of clarity will improve the clarity of the storytelling in general. Don’t leave space for uncertainty in posing out your characters. Your audience will be more engaged and entertained by the sequence.

This is the last post for the Super Week. I hope you enjoyed it. Back on the regular schedule next week (Every Tuesday).

Norm

What a great series.  Thanks for posting these!

(via nicholasmerrick)

brucebannrs:

How It Should Have Ended: Frozen [x]

(via the-names-jack-frost)

voiceofnature:

Quinta da Aveleda, Portugal. From Alicornio and Karl Gercens.

(via luxicorps)

autisticadvocacy:

overtflannel:

exaltedreviewaverse:

autistic-alligator:

autieblesam:

[Image is a poster explaining briefly the origin and meaning of green, yellow, and red interaction signal badges, referred to above as Color Communication Badges.]
deducecanoe:

justsjwthings:

oldamongdreams:

greencarnations:

CAN WE DO THESE AT CONS

SECONDED.

if youre not autistic or suffer from an actual disorder, dont use these. its not cute.

er… you know a lot of autistic people go to conventions, right? And people with social anxiety disorders and panic disorders? Shit if I could get away with using this at work I would. 

Hello there, justsjwthings.
I would like to introduce myself.  I refer to myself as Sam Thomas, though my legal name and how a lot of people know me is Matthew.  I am officially diagnosed autistic.
Over one week in June 2013 (last summer), I was in Washington, DC for an autism conference called the Autism Campus Inclusion (ACI) summer leadership program run by the Autistic Self-Advocacy Network for autistic college students.
If you have any question as to the truth of this, I would like to direct your attention to this YouTube video that ASAN produced promoting the above-mentioned conference.  I appear as the first person in the video and you can find more images of my face on my blog.
At this conference, not only did we use these communication badges pictured above, but we actually had the opportunity to meet Jim Sinclair, the inventor of these badges.
During the part of the conference in which Jim Sinclair gave us a history of Autism Network International (ANI)—which they were a co-founder of—they talked to us about the establishment of this particular piece of assistive technology.  Basically, it was a simple idea that seemed to fit a need and quickly became very popular among many autistic spaces for it’s practicality and ease of use.
The conference it originated from is called Autreat and is held annually by ANI. This is an autism conference that accepts Autistics and Cousins (ACs)—that is, anyone diagnosed or otherwise self-identifying with any disorder autistic or similar that may share a number of autistic traits.
There was a need.  The need was met.  This is how we can safely assume most technology either emerges or becomes popular.
We also talked about something called Universal Design and the Curb-Cutter Effect.  The Curb-Cutter Effect is when something to fit a specific need is found to create convenience in a broader area than intended.  Curb cuts allowing for wheelchair accessibility to sidewalks proved to also be convenient to anyone who may have trouble with steps or even simply a mother with a baby stroller or maybe a child with a wagon.  This is a desirable outcome with disability rights advocacy as creating convenience for non-disabled people often makes the assistive technology easier to advocate for.
In this sense, these colored communication badges could serve that Curb-Cutter effect.  Not only would this be perfectly acceptable for non-disabled people to use for convenience, but would also help to increase their effectiveness and convenience for those of us who need them.  Here are a few examples:
Increased popularity makes the colored communication badges more easily recognizable to the general public, making them as effective outside the above-mentioned autism conferences as inside.
Increase in demand would create increase in supply and availability, likely making these available to pretty much anyone and even being included with, say, the name tags you are required to wear at most cons.
In addition to these helping people recognize the communication state of the wearer, the wearer will be able to recognize whom they can feel more comfortable to approach.
Increased popularity would make these badges more acceptable for public use and less alienating to those who would wear them frequently.
This is not something that we are completely incapable of surviving without; this is something that was convenient and made our lives a lot easier.  If that can be easily shared with the general public, then what purpose does it serve not to share it?
Thank you for reading.

I think I’ve left some good information in this response and it may be a good read for some of our followers.  Just a bit of history and a couple concepts in disability advocacy.
~Sam

Curb-cutter effect: I should use this term more often.

Ahhh, there’s even symbols, for the peeps with color-blindness!
Also: “curb-cutter effect.” I learn something new everyday! And the badge is super relevant to anime/gaming/comics convention spaces for its original intent, given that there tends to be a greater number of peeps on the spectrum there than in the general public, anyway.
I wish for convention spaces there was some way to use these without blocking the attendee badge (A built in side-panel, with slim versions of the cards? Or full sized cards behind the badge, which would itself be slimmer than the badge-carrier-plastic-thingy, so the communication info showed off to one side?), or suffering the same fate as that one - constantly freaking flipping around. Also a way to view it from behind would be epic (and serve as a subconscious reminder that you should probably also not, like, TOUCH people without warning…), but a tricky design problem. Badges are way easier to make en masse than shoulder-patches, and you couldn’t necessarily see the symbol on someone’s shoulder….hmmm.
Outside the box thinkers, deploy!
Random related note: A good number of security staffers prone to sensory overload took refuge in the Manga Cafe - a quiet library-like space - at KitsuneKon. If your con has something similar, and you need a breather, A+ Would Recommend. Check your handbooks.
A FURTHER PEE ESS: If you throw your dollahs at things like Autism Speaks in the name of awareness and support, I would highly HIGHLY suggest you check out the Autism Self Advocacy Network (ASAN) that Sam mentions instead. By autistics, for autistics, and none of the incredibly vile practices that AS gets its gross self up to.

A message from ASAN’s President: 
"Hi folks,
 
We’re so glad to see that this poster and the color communication badge system is getting so much circulation - the poster in question was actually from ASAN’s 2013 Annual Gala. If you’re interested in learning more about using the Color Communication Badges, you can find out more information here.
 
We actually would love to see these used more at general conferences, including by non-autistic people. The Color Communication Badge system is more effective the more people use it, and it is very much intended to be used as a “universal design” accommodation for all people, with and without disabilities. If any conferences would be interested in working with us to introduce the color communication badges to their events, please feel free to contact us at info@autisticadvocacy.org.
 
We’d love to hear from you.
 
Warm regards,
Ari Ne’eman
President
Autistic Self Advocacy Network”

autisticadvocacy:

overtflannel:

exaltedreviewaverse:

autistic-alligator:

autieblesam:

[Image is a poster explaining briefly the origin and meaning of green, yellow, and red interaction signal badges, referred to above as Color Communication Badges.]

deducecanoe:

justsjwthings:

oldamongdreams:

greencarnations:

CAN WE DO THESE AT CONS

SECONDED.

if youre not autistic or suffer from an actual disorder, dont use these. its not cute.

er… you know a lot of autistic people go to conventions, right? And people with social anxiety disorders and panic disorders? Shit if I could get away with using this at work I would. 

Hello there, justsjwthings.

I would like to introduce myself.  I refer to myself as Sam Thomas, though my legal name and how a lot of people know me is Matthew.  I am officially diagnosed autistic.

Over one week in June 2013 (last summer), I was in Washington, DC for an autism conference called the Autism Campus Inclusion (ACI) summer leadership program run by the Autistic Self-Advocacy Network for autistic college students.

If you have any question as to the truth of this, I would like to direct your attention to this YouTube video that ASAN produced promoting the above-mentioned conference.  I appear as the first person in the video and you can find more images of my face on my blog.

At this conference, not only did we use these communication badges pictured above, but we actually had the opportunity to meet Jim Sinclair, the inventor of these badges.

During the part of the conference in which Jim Sinclair gave us a history of Autism Network International (ANI)—which they were a co-founder of—they talked to us about the establishment of this particular piece of assistive technology.  Basically, it was a simple idea that seemed to fit a need and quickly became very popular among many autistic spaces for it’s practicality and ease of use.

The conference it originated from is called Autreat and is held annually by ANI. This is an autism conference that accepts Autistics and Cousins (ACs)—that is, anyone diagnosed or otherwise self-identifying with any disorder autistic or similar that may share a number of autistic traits.

There was a need.  The need was met.  This is how we can safely assume most technology either emerges or becomes popular.

We also talked about something called Universal Design and the Curb-Cutter Effect.  The Curb-Cutter Effect is when something to fit a specific need is found to create convenience in a broader area than intended.  Curb cuts allowing for wheelchair accessibility to sidewalks proved to also be convenient to anyone who may have trouble with steps or even simply a mother with a baby stroller or maybe a child with a wagon.  This is a desirable outcome with disability rights advocacy as creating convenience for non-disabled people often makes the assistive technology easier to advocate for.

In this sense, these colored communication badges could serve that Curb-Cutter effect.  Not only would this be perfectly acceptable for non-disabled people to use for convenience, but would also help to increase their effectiveness and convenience for those of us who need them.  Here are a few examples:

  • Increased popularity makes the colored communication badges more easily recognizable to the general public, making them as effective outside the above-mentioned autism conferences as inside.
  • Increase in demand would create increase in supply and availability, likely making these available to pretty much anyone and even being included with, say, the name tags you are required to wear at most cons.
  • In addition to these helping people recognize the communication state of the wearer, the wearer will be able to recognize whom they can feel more comfortable to approach.
  • Increased popularity would make these badges more acceptable for public use and less alienating to those who would wear them frequently.

This is not something that we are completely incapable of surviving without; this is something that was convenient and made our lives a lot easier.  If that can be easily shared with the general public, then what purpose does it serve not to share it?

Thank you for reading.

I think I’ve left some good information in this response and it may be a good read for some of our followers.  Just a bit of history and a couple concepts in disability advocacy.

~Sam

Curb-cutter effect: I should use this term more often.

Ahhh, there’s even symbols, for the peeps with color-blindness!

Also: “curb-cutter effect.” I learn something new everyday! And the badge is super relevant to anime/gaming/comics convention spaces for its original intent, given that there tends to be a greater number of peeps on the spectrum there than in the general public, anyway.

I wish for convention spaces there was some way to use these without blocking the attendee badge (A built in side-panel, with slim versions of the cards? Or full sized cards behind the badge, which would itself be slimmer than the badge-carrier-plastic-thingy, so the communication info showed off to one side?), or suffering the same fate as that one - constantly freaking flipping around. Also a way to view it from behind would be epic (and serve as a subconscious reminder that you should probably also not, like, TOUCH people without warning…), but a tricky design problem. Badges are way easier to make en masse than shoulder-patches, and you couldn’t necessarily see the symbol on someone’s shoulder….hmmm.

Outside the box thinkers, deploy!

Random related note: A good number of security staffers prone to sensory overload took refuge in the Manga Cafe - a quiet library-like space - at KitsuneKon. If your con has something similar, and you need a breather, A+ Would Recommend. Check your handbooks.

A FURTHER PEE ESS: If you throw your dollahs at things like Autism Speaks in the name of awareness and support, I would highly HIGHLY suggest you check out the Autism Self Advocacy Network (ASAN) that Sam mentions instead. By autistics, for autistics, and none of the incredibly vile practices that AS gets its gross self up to.

A message from ASAN’s President: 

"Hi folks,
 
We’re so glad to see that this poster and the color communication badge system is getting so much circulation - the poster in question was actually from ASAN’s 2013 Annual Gala. If you’re interested in learning more about using the Color Communication Badges, you can find out more information here.
 
We actually would love to see these used more at general conferences, including by non-autistic people. The Color Communication Badge system is more effective the more people use it, and it is very much intended to be used as a “universal design” accommodation for all people, with and without disabilities. If any conferences would be interested in working with us to introduce the color communication badges to their events, please feel free to contact us at info@autisticadvocacy.org.
 
We’d love to hear from you.
 
Warm regards,
Ari Ne’eman
President
Autistic Self Advocacy Network”

(via fangirltothefullest)

the-orator:

I watched Brave for the second time recently and, while I was disappointed the first time I saw it in theaters, I liked it much better this time around and the story has really begun to grow on me and I’m starting fall in love with it.

You might notice me trying out new style and techniques based around some of my favorite artists for a while because I’m working on stretching the creative muscles and stepping out of my comfort zone. The design style in the piece was inspired by the amazing Shoomlah’s Toile designs
I was going to use a different secondary color, but gold seemed to be the only one that universally combined well with all the other colors :/ and I also decided to keep Merida’s hair red since its such a symbolic part of not only her character but the movie

(via snowballs-n-funtimes)